Vengeance Is Sweet

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Vengeance Is Sweet, self-published, January 11, 2016

ISBN 978-0-9883856-2-7

Buy link: Amazon.com (this is a Kindle exclusive)

Omara is a demon of vengeance, created to destroy humans who have harmed the innocent and bring their souls to Hell. Known for bending the rules to the breaking point, Omara is placed on probation after one too many infractions. Confined to her apartment, visited only by her friend Ghast, Omara chafes under the punishment.
A battle between two factions of beings and entities, one wanting to kill millions of humans and the other wanting to protect humanity, decimates the vengeance department, and Omara is called back to work. Her first assignment: “venge” Alejandro Ruiz, accused by the soul of his late ex-wife of abusing her and their six-year-old daughter Keeley.
Something about the case strikes Omara wrong, and she chooses to try to prove Alex’s innocence. As she becomes part of Alex and Keeley’s lives, Omara also becomes more and more human. Then she learns that the accusations against Alex are part of a plot to destroy Keeley, who is far more than she seems. To protect the humans she has come to love, Omara will do anything–including sacrificing her own existence.
NOTE: This is a revised and re-edited version of my novel originally published in 2012 under the pen name Jo Ramsey.

EXCERPT:

By the end of the following day I’d worked my way through all the files and presented them to the supervisor with a flourish when he came to check on me. “Over to you.”

“Well done.” He didn’t sound as pleased as I’d hoped. “Tomorrow when you come in, I’ll give you your first few assignments. They won’t be on the same level as before, you realize. You’ll have to prove yourself capable of following protocol on lower-level cases before we can trust you with the higher-level ones again.”

“I understand.” I tried to sound suitably submissive. I really didn’t care what type of cases he gave me. As long as I did what he said, I’d be allowed to return to the field. Nothing else mattered.

The phone rang, the Heaven hotline alerting us to an incoming case. The supervisor groaned. “I thought I’d made it clear to them that they shouldn’t send us anything more until we cleared the backlog,” he grumbled, more to himself than to me. “Omara, don’t leave yet. I have a few more conditions for you.”

I didn’t leave. I also didn’t stay at my desk. Instead, I followed him to the hotline, which he ordinarily wouldn’t have even wasted time answering. He had demons for that. However, for the third day in a row I’d seen no one else, and apparently he’d decided it would be better to answer it himself than to let me do it.

“Here,” he barked into the receiver. He snapped his fingers at me, and after a moment I caught on and brought him a pencil and paper.

I tried not to look at what he wrote. I really did. He wrote so large, though, that I found it nearly impossible not to see. “Woman, suicide, claims escaping abusive husband. Child still with husband.”

Something tingled inside me. We had a huge stack of files sitting beside my desk, cases that had to be reassigned soon, before the reason for vengeance had been forgotten. Surely my next assignments would come from that stack. Even so, my instincts told me this phone call would be my first case.

And we hadn’t heard the truth.

The supervisor set down the phone, and I quickly averted my eyes so he wouldn’t realize I’d seen his notes. He folded the paper and it disappeared. “That one will need to be assigned as soon as we deal with the orphan files,” he muttered. “At least it’s only one new case. Omara, show up tomorrow ready to go to the Midworld. Do us both a favor and refresh your memory of the rules and regulations before you come in. I wouldn’t want to have to give you a reminder course.”

The baring of his teeth gave me a pretty good idea of exactly how unpleasant that course would be.

“I’ll be here, ready to perform my duties, Lord,” I assured him.

“Good. Now go home.” He turned and stalked into his office.

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